Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 576

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 576

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 576

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 576

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_PageDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 593

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 687

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 687

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 687

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 687

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_CategoryDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/classes.php on line 710

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class wpdb in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 58

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/cache.php on line 99

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Object_Cache in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/cache.php on line 404

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/query.php on line 21

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /homepages/15/d244775686/htdocs/TDBASHome/BlogHome/BFBlog/wp-includes/theme.php on line 576
The Case for In-House Disaster Recovery
Why Green Computing? Using Security Guidelines to Open Security Vulnerabilities?
Jun 06

So you had a bad day...I’ve always advised my clients: If you choose to outsource your Disaster Recovery (DR), or any other integral, data-drenched portion of your IT domain, you should deposit all the savings directly into a high yield fund. This will be crucial when you have to deal with the litigation, remediation, and PR nightmare that accompanies the customer’s lost and compromised personal data.

Some 3rd party DR providers and Software as a Service (SaaS) vendors tout big savings…

But do you know who is working for them?
What audit records are kept about your data?
Who really has access to them?
Who are they accredited to?
How often is the site security reviewed?
How quickly can they detect an intrusion?
Can they detect data theft by an insider?

The list goes on. All of these WILL effect the total cost of utilizing this type of solution.

But why try to minimize the drain on funds a DR site represents when you can move it in-house and turn it into a revenue generator? I came across this story which details a savvy company that did just that and stands to save $750,000 PER YEAR.

Here are some ideas to turn your liability into a ROI generator:

  • DR Sites do not have to be across the country! 100-150 miles will put you on a different local power grid, and save your company thousands in travel and per diem alone.
  • You can utilize your in-house personnel and corporate knowledge to make informed decisions on maintenance!
  • You can use resources made obsolete during capital replacement, slashing stand-up costs
    By virtualizing, you can host many Virtual Machines with less hardware.
  • The brightest CIOs will utilize their disaster recovery site for: real-time replication of data AND applications, testing and development, and production load balancing.

All this, and your company retains sole strategic contol over the operation, run by employess who have a stake in your success. And that is priceless.

More to come…

Brian Fedorko

2 Responses to “The Case for In-House Disaster Recovery”

  1. Timbo Says:

    Quite impressive, hopefully the know-how to do in-house DR is available. Otherwise you may end up spending money to hire someone who would have that experience, however would also hopefully be useful in other areas too.

    Also, I dislike when the buzz word(s) “Software as a Service” are used as a marketing ploy. Since when is software NOT a service?

  2. brian.fedorko Says:

    I consider disaster recovery to be a core competency of any production IT unit. A strongcase can be made for the necessity of a comprehensive DR process during development - Loss of development hours, documenation, history of code changes, etc. can set a project back significantly!

    Because of this, your production team, and their skillsets should not be looked at as a service, but rather as an asset. While services are usually endured and limited, assets are opportunities which can be enhanced and grown.

Leave a Reply