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The Sun is setting on MySQL?
April 2009 Oracle CPU Released Ubuntu Releases 9.04!
Apr 22

Once upon a year ago, when Sun Microsystems acquired MySQL, there were many bloggers who theorized that Big Red, who had a long-running, close partnership with Sun, was pulling some strings in this deal.  The people who endorsed the idea that Oracle couldn’t put the kibosh on MySQL without a PR headache (But Sun could), were dismissed as crazy, conspiracy-theory people.  My only surprise so far is the courteous lack of ‘I told you so’ popping up in the expert blogs.

So where do we go from here?  Oracle doesn’t have any experience in hardware.  If they keep most of Sun’s staffing, and continue to fund their innovation efforts, we may continue to see excellent products from them.  But will they retain their stellar brand identity?  Will they abandon the Sparc chip architecture and adopt x86?  It seems the best solution here looks more like a tightly coupled partnership rather than a merging of the two companies.

From Oracle’s whitepaper on the decision, MySQL’s fate seems a little less promising:

MySQL will be an addition to Oracle’s existing suite of database products, which already includes Oracle Database 11g, TimesTen, Berkeley DB open source database, and the open source transactional storage engine, InnoDB.

This doesn’t sound like Oracle is poised to grow MySQL and allow it to flourish.  At this time MySQL 6.0 is in Public Alpha, and has added the Falcon transactional engine as an advanced alternative to InnoDB, and SolidDB.  Looking at the architecture, this engine brings some industrial-grade caching, recovery, and long transaction support to MySQL.  Couple this with the real deal disaster recovery 6.0 is bringing to the table, and you have a free multi-platform database that rivals everything an Oracle database can offer outside of Enterprise Edition, and soundly trounces the latest Microsoft SQLServer offering.

But will Oracle put the resources toward MySQL, to allow it to be all it can be?  Personally, I don’t see it happening, but I hope I am very, very wrong.

Sid

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