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Unix
Apr 22

Once upon a year ago, when Sun Microsystems acquired MySQL, there were many bloggers who theorized that Big Red, who had a long-running, close partnership with Sun, was pulling some strings in this deal.  The people who endorsed the idea that Oracle couldn’t put the kibosh on MySQL without a PR headache (But Sun could), were dismissed as crazy, conspiracy-theory people.  My only surprise so far is the courteous lack of ‘I told you so’ popping up in the expert blogs.

So where do we go from here?  Oracle doesn’t have any experience in hardware.  If they keep most of Sun’s staffing, and continue to fund their innovation efforts, we may continue to see excellent products from them.  But will they retain their stellar brand identity?  Will they abandon the Sparc chip architecture and adopt x86?  It seems the best solution here looks more like a tightly coupled partnership rather than a merging of the two companies.

From Oracle’s whitepaper on the decision, MySQL’s fate seems a little less promising:

MySQL will be an addition to Oracle’s existing suite of database products, which already includes Oracle Database 11g, TimesTen, Berkeley DB open source database, and the open source transactional storage engine, InnoDB.

This doesn’t sound like Oracle is poised to grow MySQL and allow it to flourish.  At this time MySQL 6.0 is in Public Alpha, and has added the Falcon transactional engine as an advanced alternative to InnoDB, and SolidDB.  Looking at the architecture, this engine brings some industrial-grade caching, recovery, and long transaction support to MySQL.  Couple this with the real deal disaster recovery 6.0 is bringing to the table, and you have a free multi-platform database that rivals everything an Oracle database can offer outside of Enterprise Edition, and soundly trounces the latest Microsoft SQLServer offering.

But will Oracle put the resources toward MySQL, to allow it to be all it can be?  Personally, I don’t see it happening, but I hope I am very, very wrong.

Sid

Jan 17

LanguageHave you ever run into this situation: You are happily scripting out or designing a new capability, performing maintenance, or providing support. Perhaps you are eating lunch, or are home in bed, soundly sleeping at 3:00AM.

And then it happens.

Something broke somewhere, and it is database-related. No, it is not something you’ve built, maintained, or even seen - It is something from another business area, and their help is not available.

When you arrive, you are greeted by the ever-present group of concerned stake-holders, and a terminal. Will you staunch the flow of money they may be hemorrhaging? Will you bring back the data they may have lost? Will you be able to restore their system to service?

What you don’t want to do is flounder because they don’t have your favorite management software, your preferred shell, or your favorite OS.

Learn to speak the native languages!

There are 3 skill sets every good data storage professional should keep current at all times, outside of their core RDBMS interface languages:

  • Bourne Shell (bash)
  • vi (Unix/inux text editor)
  • CMD Shell

I guarantee that any Linux system you log into will have bash and vi. I personally prefer the korn shell for navigation, and the c shell for scripting - but the bourne shell is on every system. Same with vi - Except, I really prefer vi to anything else.

This means no matter what Linux or Unix server you are presented with, you can become effective immediately.

I’ve included Microsoft Windows command shell is included because it fits in with a parallel reason for learning the native language - you can proactively increase survivability in your data storage and management systems by using the tools and utilities you KNOW will be available - Even if libraries are unavailable, even if interpreters and frameworks are lost/broken.

If the operating system can boot, you can be sure the bourn shell or CMD shell is available for use.

Knowing that, you should consider scripting the most vital system functions using the available shell script, and initiating them with the operating system’s integral scheduling tool (crontab/Scheduled Tasks). This way you can ensure that if the OS is up, your vital scripts will be executed!

And who doesn’t want that?