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Windows
Jan 17

LanguageHave you ever run into this situation: You are happily scripting out or designing a new capability, performing maintenance, or providing support. Perhaps you are eating lunch, or are home in bed, soundly sleeping at 3:00AM.

And then it happens.

Something broke somewhere, and it is database-related. No, it is not something you’ve built, maintained, or even seen - It is something from another business area, and their help is not available.

When you arrive, you are greeted by the ever-present group of concerned stake-holders, and a terminal. Will you staunch the flow of money they may be hemorrhaging? Will you bring back the data they may have lost? Will you be able to restore their system to service?

What you don’t want to do is flounder because they don’t have your favorite management software, your preferred shell, or your favorite OS.

Learn to speak the native languages!

There are 3 skill sets every good data storage professional should keep current at all times, outside of their core RDBMS interface languages:

  • Bourne Shell (bash)
  • vi (Unix/inux text editor)
  • CMD Shell

I guarantee that any Linux system you log into will have bash and vi. I personally prefer the korn shell for navigation, and the c shell for scripting - but the bourne shell is on every system. Same with vi - Except, I really prefer vi to anything else.

This means no matter what Linux or Unix server you are presented with, you can become effective immediately.

I’ve included Microsoft Windows command shell is included because it fits in with a parallel reason for learning the native language - you can proactively increase survivability in your data storage and management systems by using the tools and utilities you KNOW will be available - Even if libraries are unavailable, even if interpreters and frameworks are lost/broken.

If the operating system can boot, you can be sure the bourn shell or CMD shell is available for use.

Knowing that, you should consider scripting the most vital system functions using the available shell script, and initiating them with the operating system’s integral scheduling tool (crontab/Scheduled Tasks). This way you can ensure that if the OS is up, your vital scripts will be executed!

And who doesn’t want that?

Aug 10

Black Hat and DefCon, the premier Information Assurance venue for bleeding edge vulnerability and exploit research just wrapped up in Las Vegas.

The Good: The published presentations including a host of discussion about security in a virtualized environment, the sad state of Microsoft SQL Server security, and much, much more. Topping it all off was the announcement of the Windows Vista security bypass exploit via the browser by Mark Dowd and Alexander Sotirov. This is a particularly bruising find on Microsoft’s latest flagship, as it is quite a resource consumer, fairly annoying to use, but at least it was secure… Maybe now is a good time to try Ubuntu?

The Bad: The Pwnie Awards.  Unless you are in the ‘Most Innovative Research’ category, this is BlackHat’s Hall of Shame for security shortcomings.   A lesson learned from other’s mistakes is hopefully a lesson you don’t have to experience first-hand!

And the Ugly: A group of reporters from E-Week were covering Black Hat 2008 for their Security News.  They were too lazy to use their secured VPN to log into their home servers, so they just let their credentials pass in the clear… At a hacker convention… The shameful part is they threw the three responsible attendees out when they tried to submit these credentials to The Wall of Sheep.

Brian Fedorko